Project Two. Plaid one piece dress with plaids matching at side seams.

Note: I 86ed the ruffle at the bottom for lack of fabric and also the lighting on the back of the dress isn’t so flattering in this photo .

Our assignment had to be shown to the review panel for the upcoming fashion show.

I fitted everything to a size 6. I found a model very last minute who’s a size 6 on top and a size 10 on the bottom, hence why my wrap skirt “fit” but became a slit skirt quite quickly, which I just kindof made to work while presenting.

As you can see, I wasn’t totally aware I was being photographed at that minute, and I was incredibly nervous.

This is me in my natural habit, in the class studio, trial-and-erroring everything:

Assignment: Create a 2 piece look using draping techniques.

Criteria: Woven fabrics only, has to fit the “technology” theme of the fashion as chosen in fabric and accessories. Must pass the approval board of the fashion show.

My ideas were as follows, the chosen garments were chosen from 2 different sketches via my professor:

My ideas related to technology are a historical inspiration, capturing the bronze age. The skirt is taken from the royal skirt of Egyptian Pharaohs, and the top is a Greek inspiration. Pattern development to come!

Final tailoring project – Jacket with notched collar and bound buttons and patch pockets.

Finally I got to make something for me!

Dress, as modeled by Christina.

As we approach rainy, cold days in where I find myself in the rare position of nothing to do, I knit.

I turned this –

yarnhat

yarnhatfull

into this -

close

fullhat

fullhatdown

Much of the time, my color combination choices just happen to be laying side by side as balls of yarn and it makes me review colors in a new angle. Grey, green and alternating browns and red yarns are not what I’d have picked otherwise. Unexpected usually creates something more authentic.

Completed dress, with wedged back, zipper, lining and hem. Most of this work was a hand sewing marathon.

Tomorrow I photograph full garment as modeled by the woman I fitted it to!

So in love with this fabric:

My dress, still in pieces at the sides and waist and chock full of raw edges everywhere!

Dressfront

dressback
dressfronttop

dressbacktop

My actual model is a svelte figured gal, and my dress form is more resemblant of a collapsing runway model in Milan. It is adjustable, but I haven’t mastered the ratio of its proportions quite yet.

This week: Some fitting, installing a lining, a zipper, finished seams and then a hem.

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